A Day in the Life Blogs

A Day in the Life of a Mayer Alloys Intern- Caitlin Quill

Caitlin was an intern with Mayer Alloys during the Fall 2017 MKT 393 class and continued her internship through the school year. 

What is it like to be a marketing intern at a metals company? Well from an intern at Mayer Alloys it can be quite different then working for some of your other marketing internships. Mayer Alloys is a Detroit based solder distributer who focuses on businesses to business solder sales, electronic recycling and metal scraping. Therefore I have to focus on business rather than individuals and the content that I put together is targeted towards other business. Mayer Alloys is a small business, we have about 10 employees but they do move a lot of business and outsource a lot of their distribution and marketing.

Some of my daily tasks include running the social media pages like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. I also write blogs posts discussing the solder and recycling industry in order to help drive traffic to our website and therefore help to create leads and educate our customers on any solder or recycling questions they might have. I help manage their contacts and deals through their CRM system; Hubspot. I do also sit in on meeting where we discuss a marketing planning, including SEO and how to enhance their website, like adding pillar pages and CTA’s. Here is an example of a CTA ad that I made and a blog post:

Example of a CTA ad that Intern Caitlin Quill made

Since Mayer Alloys is a small business I am having a very hands on role within the company. Because Mayer Alloys is small my role switches a lot from day to day depending on what needs to be done for the company. Although it is a lot of work I am learning so much and I believe I wouldn’t learn this much about marketing if I were at a large corporation. I can see the effect of everything I do and everything I post so it can be very rewarding. The metals industry is a very niche industry so there are always challenges trying to tap that market and figuring out what marketing techniques will reach our target audience.

Overall, being a marketing intern at a metals company is interesting and very hands on but a very rewarding experience. I have learned so much and I am more prepared for a job in the marketing world after I graduate!

 

A Day in the Life of the Worldly Strategies Intern- Cettina Nardulli

As the Digital Marketing Coordinator for Worldly Strategies, not one day is ever repetitive or mundane. Worldly Strategies, a digital marketing agency started by a DePaul alum,

Intern candidate Cettina cheering on DePaul

serves both small and medium sized businesses by utilizing the exponentially powerful realm of online marketing. The agency currently has over fifteen clients, while only having two employees–Becca Berkenstadt (the founder) and myself.

picture of instagram account

Doug Bruno Camp Instagram

Becca and I meet weekly to discuss current projects and learn new techniques. The remainder of my work is done at home. Each meeting flies by as both of us are fully engaged in the tasks at hand and eager to learn new things. Some of the knowledge Becca has passed on to me includes: web design, search engine optimization, creating content calendars for social media, and setting up online ads. After some detailed note taking and much question asking, I add a new skill to my toolbox! I take this knowledge with me and carry out more client projects from home.

Something that continuously keeps me on my toes is the diversity of industries that our clients reside in. One moment I am crafting an Instagram post for Doug Bruno Girls Basketball Camp, and the next I am creating a business card for M. Martin & Co. Jewelers. This need to make a quick switch keeps me both engaged and always entertained.

“After some detailed note taking and much question asking, I add a new skill to my toolbox!”

Being a Digital Marketing Coordinator also means having various Gmail, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. With so many accounts, I forget I have a personal one of my own! Using social media is important to our clients because more likes and follows lead to more interactions and ultimately increased transactions for their businesses. Managing social media is like an art and science. I test out new filters and types of posts then see how the followers react.

Chicago Visitors Guide Launch Party photo with 4 attendees

Chicago Visitors Guide Launch Party

An unforgettable experience has been launching another one of Becca’s companies, Chicago Visitors Guide: an online magazine giving tourists and locals the inside scoop on all things Chicago. We hosted a launch party at Catalyst Ranch complete with raffle prizes, a storytelling video, and a delicious cake from Sweet Mandy B’s. We also handle all the marketing and article writing for Chicago Visitors Guide alongside a few other writers.

Over the past eight months at my internship, I have acquired so much knowledge and have been able to gain experience in the fast-paced real world of marketing. At Worldly Strategies, while some processes are the same, I never know what could be next–and I love that!

 

A Day in the Life of a Do312 Intern- Abbey Johnson

A day in the life at Do312 begins with knocking on the East Room window to get in; the company’s office is in the space below. Do312 is a media company that promotes music and night life in Chicago run by Scott Cramer, General Manager, Ami York, Accounts, Katie Karpowicz and Dan Opera, Content and Editorial, and Lorena Cupcake, Social Media and Marketing.  These people have interns, my position is a Social Media Marketing Intern. As you walk into the office you are greeted by Lorena and her Chihuahua named Fixie. Monday’s are hectic because there are a lot of people in the office and there are a lot of meetings. Once I find my spot to settle in for the day I set up my laptop and look at my tasks due for Asana. Asana is a program that helps us all organize our tasks, allows us to review content edits and acts as our calendar.

My tasks involve creating event pages and writing tweets and Facebook posts about upcoming concerts or giveaways. I also select images from our Flickr albums to use in content and on our Instagram page. I research logistics for parties we throw; one afternoon I was getting quotes on money blowing machines. Every day looks different here but every day we are listening to good music and drinking La Croix. This internship has taught me how important social media is to a company’s growth. When we look back at engagement we see what our user base responds to (cute pictures of animals, Lollapalooza giveaways and the Pitchfork lineup). I am learning that media is one of the most important aspects of marketing. This internship has taught me a lot about Chicago as well. I am constantly having to research some of the best places to eat, drink and have fun and because of this I have discovered a lot more about the city. My favorite part of interning is working the events, I tie-dyed t-shirts, took tickets at a concert, and worked their “birthday party”.  This internship has increased my connections with people and has given me a better idea about what goes into marketing.

 

A Day in the Life of a TransparentCareer Intern- Hauk Nelson

Hi! My name is Hauk, and I am a marketing associate at TransparentCareer, a career services startup in Chicago. Welcome to “A Day in the Life of a Marketing Intern.” I’m one of seven people working in the office, including two other interns.

Coincidentally, my main job at TransparentCareer revolves around content creation and user engagement, including writing for our blog, so I’m happy to write a post for our marketing class as well!

My job is to keep our users coming back and checking our site often. The more people we have actively using the site, the more chances we have to connect with customers. Our primary audience is MBA students. I’ve been working here since November, and we as a company have gone through a lot of strategic changes in how to best keep engaged with our community, and a few months ago we decided that the best way to keep TransparentCareer in our users’ minds was to send a weekly newsletter, filled with content that we also create.

It’s Tuesday, it’s 9 am, and it’s time to get to work. Our newsletter goes out at 2 pm every Tuesday, so it’s my responsibility to get everything ready. I finished writing our content last week, so the next step is to schedule the newsletter to be sent out through MailChimp. 

I segment the newsletter to be sent out to different demographics, which we’ve decided to change based on the audience’s class year, sending a separate email (same content, different copy) to the Class of 2018, Class of 2019, and MBA graduates. I write a subject line pertinent to the content, design the email to look pretty, and schedule for 2 pm.

You can get a look at the opener above, but to see the rest of the content, you’ll have to sign up for TransparentCareer!

Lunch time! We head out as a team to celebrate our lead developer’s birthday. Happy birthday Neel!

The rest of the day is spent planning the content for the next week, digging for data to use via Chartio, and then, once I finish writing the article, uploading the content to WordPress and making sure it looks good for next week’s newsletter!

 

 

A Day in The Life of a Consolidated Concepts Intern- Torey Gostek

Diving into the professional work environment, you must start somewhere. Although I’ve had previous exposure to the marketing industry working for another company independently, I’ve never worked in a professional office setting on a team, as a Sales and Marketing Analyst Intern.  The company I’m interning for is called Consolidated Concepts. It is part of a family of companies, under the name “Emerging,” that elevate restaurant and entertainment concepts to be among the top in the industry. Although I help all four companies under Emerging, I spend most of my time working for Consolidated Concepts, which optimizes supply chain for restaurants across the nation. The company employs around 100 people altogether but the office in Chicago, being very small, has only 20.

5A lot of my time involves researching new restaurant chains in which our supply chain optimization can be implemented. While searching for leads, I can be creative. Aside from looking in our data bases, there are numerous news sites or blogs that mention chains that align with our lead qualification criteria. We also discovered that we can get leads through alert messages which warns us of restaurant chains that are emerging, growing, merging, etc. Utilizing these alerts, has allowed us to place the ones that meet our criteria into a trigger-event campaign. This essentially means placing the customer into a specific email workflow, depending on whether they are a client or potential client. We use Marketo as the marketing automation software which helps send these email-triggered-events and it creates the workflows to engage customers and prospects. The process is efficient because it reaches over 200 leads every couple of weeks with one click of a button, while rest of the process is automated until a lead becomes qualified. Then, it’s up to the Sales Representative to take that qualified lead.

I’m working on another major project directly with the President of Emerging. We are putting together a blog that educates and inspires restaurant operators and C-Level Executives in areas such as real estate, data intelligence, cost reduction, and beverage education. The goal of this blog is not only to become the leader in educating emerging restaurants, but to gain more leads and obviously boost business. Along with writing white papers for the blog and interviewing c-level executives, I am learning about the marketing automation process for blogs as well. We are using HubSpot as our blogging platform. HubSpot is an inbound marketing and sales software that helps companies attract visitors, convert leads, and close business. I can’t wait to see what new business our blog brings in.

 

A Day in the Life of a ZGiRLS Marketing Intern- Bianca Perry

Who you are working for?
6During my sophomore year, I started working with the ZGiRLS Foundation, because it aligns perfectly with my passion for empowering girls and community building strengths. Thenon-profit startup is a confidence building and mentorship program for adolescent girls in sports. ZGiRLS Curriculum™ has helped over 1,200 young athletes across the country build self-esteem and mental resilience in sports, and more importantly life.

How big is your company?
Former NCAA and Olympians athletes, Jilyne Higgins and Libby Ludlow founded ZGiRLS. Since 2012, dozens of interns, five board members, and two-full times employees have joined our company. In spite of our small team size, our impact on the world is immeasurable!

What’s your title?
I’m an Ambassador Community Captain. It’s a brand new marketing
role that I created alongside the leadership team. My focus is
activating and engaging our Ambassador team of Olympic and
professional athletes. Each individual represents and supports the
organization in unique way. Collectively, they are core to moving the
ball forward for the next generation of girls.

7Can you share more about your day-to-day activities?
Building a nationwide community of all-star athletes takes a mix of
consistent and valuable digital and personal touches. On a daily
basis, I interact with potential and current ZGiRLS ambassadors on our social media channels (@gozgirls) with likes and comments . It is an easy way to casually start conversations as well as make our team members feel special. Beyond social media, I use texting and emailing to ask our ambassadors to
complete activities such as taking over our Instagram story or
participating in a webinar, as they all have committed to a monthly
investment of five to 60 minutes of engagement with our ZGiRLS
network. Once a week the founder and I work one-on-one to develop
strategy, initiatives and evaluate my execution; in the meetings, she
empowers me continue to creative ways of bringing people together.

Can you reflect on your internship? What are you learning?
There was a huge learning curve, because we created the role
together from scratch and started the ambassador program with a
blank slate. It has been rewarding to have autonomy to shape the
future of our ambassador community. First I was tasked with designing
and iterating a scalable process to recruit, activate and engage
athletes. Within five months, I grew the team from 20 inactive
ambassadors to over 30 engaged members of the team, which has
contributed to girls signing up for our Summer Adventure Camp. Being
deeply involved in the movement has led me to realize the power of
mobilizing women and girls make a positive change.

A Day in the Life of Marketing Intern at RPA Advertising- Cecelia Metzdorff

8During my senior year at DePaul, I have had the pleasure of working at RPA Advertising. RPA, a full-service advertising agency, is headquartered in sunny Santa Monica, CA with seven regional offices throughout the US. RPA has 725 full-time employees across all offices and our Chicago office has about 10 of those team members.  My position is as an Assistant Local Media Negotiator. If you’re like me when I first saw the job title, you’re probably wondering, what in the world does that mean?

Trust me, it’s not as complicated as it sounds. My role falls under the Local Media department, whose basic function is to negotiate TV and Radio airtime for our clients’ commercials. Some of RPA’s clients include Honda, Acura, La-Z-Boy, Dole Fruit, and apartments.com.

11In my position, I assist the Local Media Negotiators with the execution and maintenance of media schedules. After a schedule is negotiated and ordered with a station, the best-case scenario is that everything runs exactly as it was ordered. However, there are reasons the TV or radio station sometimes cannot air the spot. A few examples of why this would happen are scheduling changes, breaking news, a rain-out or overtime during a sporting event, a new special being added to the schedule, a program getting cancelled, or even the station overselling the time slot. The station will come back with their best “makegood”.  A “makegood” is an offer where the station will make the spot purchased (that is unable to air as ordered) good in another program and/or time-slot with equal or better ratings. One responsibility of my job is to negotiate and reject or approve makegoods. For example, the Local Media Negotiator purchases a 1030-second spot in the Big Bang Theory to air in May. As May approaches, the TV station changes their schedule and sees that The Big Bang Theory may not be airing that week. The station would send a makegood for Modern Family. In this situation, I would pull Nielsen demographic ratings and consider the client’s marketing objectives to make sure that Modern Family targets the same or a better audience than The Big Bang Theory. If it does, the makegood will be accepted. If it does not, the station will send me a new makegood for evaluation.

Another aspect of my role is processing the media billing. After the schedules run, RPA needs to pay the TV and radio stations.  One of my responsibilities is to make sure everything ran correctly and within client guidelines before payments are processed.  Sometimes the stations will remove spots or makegood spots without approval. In those cases, I communicate with the stations to find out what happened and if it can still be approved for payment. These are some of my major tasks; however, I have other tasks as assigned as well.

9Before starting at RPA, I didn’t know a lot about how the advertising world operates aside from what I learned watching Mad Men. My role has allowed me to learn a lot about how the industry works and get hands on experience doing work that keeps the agency successfully operating, rather than busy work or intern projects that never see the light of day. The culture is laid-back and everyone is very approachable with any questions. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time at RPA and I’m proud of the work that the agency makes for our clients. It’s pretty cool knowing that your agency was responsible every time you see a Honda ad!

I encourage other Marketing majors to branch out from current notions of marketing roles and to try something new – I’m definitely glad I did!

 

A Day in the Life of a UPshow Intern- Aida Moradi

13When you are looking for an internship, do you immediately glance over the job description and quietly in your head read, “grunt work?” Well, I did. I knew that if I applied for my first internship, I should just anticipate going on plenty of coffee runs and doing things that had little to nothing to do with the field I was interested in. Once I walked into UPshow, seeing that it was a laid-back start-up company with a social media mural on disply right when you walk into the office and white picnic tables instead of real tables, I realized that I might be wrong about my assumption.

The day I was hired, I was given the title, “Client Success Manager.” Such a prestigious label for a freshly hired intern! With only 25 people working for UPshow, I just assumed they didn’t already have that position filled so I gladly took the fancy title. The first few weeks at UPshow, I was given the tasks of creating spotlights and surveys for our clients. The spotlights are for their televisions in their bars that highlight certain events they host, such as Trivia Night or Happy Hour. I would go and creep around on the specific bar or restaurants’ social media pages to find out what events they are not utilizing for our spotlight feature. Then I would create the spotlight and apply it to their televisions right from my laptop in the office.

12After a short while, I was told to “scrap that” and start doing something else. I showed a slight interest in learning data analytics, so my boss wanted me to get started right away! I was given all the tools to figure out the data for each client and how they are doing each day, week, month, and year with our product. I now create leaderboards and case studies for certain clients that we want to, “tell the best story” to in order to keep them as a regular client. These are clients that want to see how UPshow is benefitting them. A leaderboard is for a client that has multiple locations or branches, and I create a presentation with each of their data analytics. A case study is for singular clients that want to see their data in terms of the past 3 months and 6 months, as well as overall data. Basically, all this data is showing our clients that we can get them more customers into their venues, and this will lend itself to increasing their sales.

What I have taken from this internship is that a start-up is a lot of work. Each individual working for UPshow wears multiple hats. Everyone needs to be skilled in how to manage roughly each aspect of the company. Each of us should know how to create social media content, create accounts, package and ship boxes, data analytics, customer service, and of course, knowing how to use the product. I have learned about the more creative side to marketing, where I had to create spotlights on Canva. I also had to learn the more numbers focused portion of marketing with all the data analytics. I have even learned about some tools that businesses use in order to keep their company running, such as, Sales Force. This internship has helped me understand marketing a little better, and how it encompasses many different aspects of sales.

 

A Day in the Life of a United Airlines Intern- Michaela Hrbacek

I work for United Airlines as the Community Affairs Intern. The community affairs department focuses on building and maintaining partnerships with non-profits and building employee engagement and volunteering programs. Employee engagement in volunteering helps work culture, promotes team building and passionate community members, and most importantly benefits those served by volunteers.

United Airlines has over 82,000 employees living on 6 continents. The employees, as well as the customers, are global, which means always being respectful and culturally aware of those around you. There’s a huge variety of careers at United—there are pilots, flight attendants, operations & logistics, corporate support, and so many other roles. United wants their employees happy with the work they are doing, so moving around and changing career paths within the company is very popular and even encouraged.

As the intern in the department, I ran the Adventure Bear program, which is where groups of employees visit nearby children’s hospitals to distribute our Ben Flyin’ teddy bear and activity books. On top of that, I have aided in building out employee volunteer activities with local non-profits in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, Denver, and Newark/New York.  My day-to-day activities usually include a lot of communications—I’m either on my e-mail or on the phone, talking with my coworkers in different regions around the U.S., or talking with outside organizations and coordinating events and programs for employees.

While I’m cooped behind a desk most of the time, I get to do really cool things out of the office as well. Just last week, I went to the American Cancer Society’s Discovery Ball Gala, which included huge companies like Boeing as well as political and celebrity figures like Rahm Emmanuel and James Corden. It’s really cool that I was able to go to the Gala, and sit second row, as an intern. We also do big volunteer events that I get to help logistically set up, and then execute day of. We did a food packaging event where almost 300,000 meals were packed by the top officers and executives at United. It was great to see their passion and commitment to underserved communities. It creates a great company culture, and definitely rubs off on the employees.

I’ve really enjoyed my position at United as a Community Affairs Intern. It’s been great to develop my communication skills—making sure I am concise and clear, getting all pertinent information out there without adding in confusing details. I’ve also been able to develop my skills with Microsoft Office, and most significantly, my excel skills. I’ve been able to work with many departments within the company—government affairs, environmental affairs, and PR, just to name a few. It’s nice to be able to network and create awesome opportunities. I’ve had a great experience so far, and look forward to continuing my work here. The flight benefits don’t hurt either.

 

A Day in the Life of a Signature Branding Intern- Stephanie Cucinella

16Signature Branding is a high-end merchandising solutions company for artists, musicians and music festivals. They focus on delivering product that has high quality material and visual art that captures the client’s vision, while offering better revenue generation opportunities for the clients. They carry a competitive advantage from creating product from low cost strategies but consistently delivering the best possible solutions. The company believes that when fans have better merchandise from artists, more sincere and long term relationships are built with the artists.

As social media marketing intern at Signature Branding I have the responsibility to create original posts on all social media platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, analyze the engagement and sales that correlate with posts that I create promoting the product.

Additionally, I audit social media pages for clients, competitor’s companies, festivals, artists and musicians that the company would like to work with in the future. I interact on those pages and share the page’s content to create engagement. One of the most important day-to-day tasks for the social media marketing intern is to keep up with current trends, lineup releases, new art, and new songs from musicians. When everything can be connected, it is easier to tag the pages in a post drawing more attention from outsiders and people who do not “Like” Signature Brandings page, but like pages that Signature Branding has interacted with.

15This post was on Signature Brandings page, it shared another company’s article off their Facebook page that discussed a music festival and musicians that Signature Branding would like to work with in the future. On Signature Branding’s post I was able to tag that music festival and artist from the article, and connect them to our current client’s music festival where the same artist played at in 2016, bringing together our current clients and future clients while also still promoting our brand. Being aware of these connections helps Signature Brandings page become more exposed to different audiences within similar demographics. It is a way of online cross-promotion.

I also have been getting more involved in photoshoots, collection releases and information about upcoming projects. The more involvement I have in these internal projects, I am able to communicate about these upcoming releases on social media. The more that is communicated about the company on social media platforms, we are able to build more relationships with customers, clients and clients fans. For example, Signature Branding is releasing “collection one” at an event the company organized. The event includes a panel of Chicago natives that work in the streetwear, art, fashion and music industries and will discuss the intersection between music, art and fashion. Leading up to the event, I have created posts that talk about the panelists and focused on individual talents each panelist has, then connected it to their relationship with Signature Branding.

14           I enjoy everything I do at Signature Branding. I am interested in the music, fashion and art industry and enjoy exploring new music, artists and festivals. This intern ship is helping me network and broaden my knowledge about music, genres, artists and festivals. I am learning about companies, brands, artists, and musicians all over the United States I have never heard of. I have freedom to engage and interact with companies, musicians, artists and festivals I enjoy while also promoting Signature Brandings products. One thing I love about Signature Branding is the sincerity, determination and creative design behind every product. I have stickers, prints and clothing from Signature Branding that I love, not only do I get to learn about all these people and companies in the industry, I get to promote a product I sincerely love.

 

Being A Marketing Intern for MK Zubes- Allison Murphy

The company I work for is MK Zubes. It is an online women’s clothing company that specializes in modest clothing for Muslim women. The company wants to provide these women with fashionable choices for dressing modestly. Though mainly targeted to Muslim women, the clothing is on trend and fashionable and can therefore be worn and appreciated by any woman. The store operates mainly online, but throughout the year puts up booths at fairs and events to
increase sales and grow its customer base.

16I am a digital marketing intern. This means that I help with the company’s social media and online presence. I work with the analytics of the social media accounts and website (checking how many page visitors an Instagram post brings in, and if a promotion posted on social media brings in sales). I also help photograph products for social media posts and create graphic images to announce sales and convey the company’s message. Lastly, I help organize the company’s website, and also work to make banner images for the homepage and product images and details.

Most of my work is done remotely. I am given product to photograph by my boss and must send them to her to be approved. She also sends me messages asking to make graphic images to post on social media or resize and edit images to make them into banners. I have access to the back end of the site, allowing me to see what Instagram posts work to bring in customers to the site. I meet with my boss once a week to plan out the weeks marketing plan and to make sure we are on the same page and are on track. My boss often uses this time to tell me what work of mine she likes and doesn’t like, allowing me to make changes and improve.

15The company is small, only including 15 employees in total. Though many employees live in the Chicago area, some live in other parts of the country and therefore most communication is done online. Once a week, the marketing team holds a Google hangout so that we can all talk about the projects we are working on and what needs to be done. Communication with other teams is typically done through Slack. The small size of the company makes communicating much easier than if this were a company with many employees.

This internship has been a great experience for me overall. I have come to find that I want to peruse a more creative aspect of marketing. This internship allows me to do just that. I have the opportunity to work with both analytics and design, which is an experience I do not think I would get at another company. Furthermore, I am interested in fashion and style so I enjoy working for a clothing company.

14Another main reason why I like working for this company and why I have had such a positive experience is because I work for and with wonderful people. I work with powerful, hardworking women who are consistently inspiring me and empowering me to work harder every day.

 

A Day in the Life of a GYMGUYZ Intern- Jessica Genovese

I work for a company called GYMGUYZ. We are the leader’s in-Home Personal Training, and are committed to enhancing and changing the overall health and fitness of individuals worldwide. GYMGUYZ was founded in 2008 by Josh York, and the company had an immediate kick-off. To date, there are over 100 GYMGUYZ franchises in over 15 states, and we are currently working on opening a franchise in the U.K.

20While in the office, I search for different marketing events that we can display a booth at. I have to make sure that the events are affordable, realistic for us, and will be heavily populated. Negotiating booth pricing is also an important task, since our marketing budget is extremely low. Once my marketing events are booked, I go and attend these events with the goal of obtaining contact information from interested leads. After the marketing events, I call all of the leads and try to book them for our free assessment. Along with marketing events, I attend various amounts of Networking Events to try and build relationships with businesses. Once there is a relationship, I book a meeting to try and sell our Corporate Wellness Programs to their company.

I have learned a lot working here. I have learned how to create email campaigns, and how to tell which are successful or not. I have learned and became extremely comfortable with networking, and using networking to expand our business. My telemarketing skills have also improved with the high number of phone calls I conduct each week. Most of all, I have learned that “Success isn’t given, It’s Earned”. Working here and starting up a brand new company has taught me how difficult it is just to break even every month. I have taken into consideration how strategic you must be to earn business, and most importantly, retain business. I am very thankful for the opportunity to be able to lead a marketing team, and to learn the process of starting up a brand new company.

 

A Day in the Life of a Sales and Guest Service Intern at Entertainment Cruises- Christine Jengwa

Chicago is known for its beautiful skyline with tall buildings. Being a student in business, I always wanted to work in one of the “tall buildings”. I am fortunate enough to be able to walk into the NBC Tower every day for my internship (pictured on the right).

17Being a Sales and Guest Service Intern at Entertainment Cruises has taught me a lot about human interactions. Day in and day out I am on the phone helping guests create unforgettable memories on our lunch, dinner, and excursion cruises. I deal with a large variety of phone calls. Anything as small as what shoes am I allowed to wear on the cruise from something as big as planning an engagement on the cruise.

Being the romantic loving, sappy girl I am, helping a nervous man organize his reservation for the big proposal is extremely exciting. Every day I not only get to do my job of serving guests and creating reservations for them, I also get to hear their stories. Hearing about guests who went on our cruises years ago and are now returning with their daughters and sons are what makes this job easy to go to each and every day.

There are about 5,000 employees in our company, yet I feel like they are always catering to each and every one of us as if there were only ten. Being an intern, I am fortunate enough to be able to jump onto projects to better improve our company. The latest project I got to be a part of was analyzing the calls from our new line of excursion cruises and tailoring our website to better serve these guests.

18As my time at Entertainment Cruises is about to wrap up, I reflect on the transferable skills that I have gained for future opportunities. I got the chance to work directly with our guests and truly understand how to tailor to their needs. Being on the phone for eight hours a day can be draining, but here at Entertainment Cruises it truly teaches you what the consumers are thinking. Consumers are what drives companies. Getting the hands on experience of guest service is something I will bring with me to my future career.

I have a few weeks left here at the NBC Tower for Entertainment Cruises. This internship has taught me valuable people skills and I have enjoyed my time here. I have a few free cruises to enjoy, as a perk of working at this company. I am excited to get to enjoy them in these next weeks (on the ship pictured above). There is one large thing I hope to fulfill before my time is done. I hope to run into Steve Harvey at the NBC Tower. I have been preparing my elevator speech for this single moment.

 

A Day in the Life of Let’s Dissect Intern-

Let’s Dissect the Intern

Let’s think1 of it as the best game of Operation: I do not buzz, except for when the phone rings nor I do not have plastic pieces that need to be taken out of my body. Although, every part of me is essential to being the Marketing Communications Intern in the DePaul Community and Government Relations Office. I will work from the bottom up, and as I get closer to the top the more you will know about the life of an intern.

Feet and legs, they go together naturally. Without these how do I get to work? I walk in through the revolving door, step onto the elevator and rise to the 19th floor. I walk into our office of six, sometimes seven, and take a seat to get right to work. These feet and legs have dashed to make copies, stood up to greet guests, crossed to take on an important meeting, and leaped to shake President Obama’s hand. Yes, my feet and legs needed to move to be the intern.3

Hands and arms, similar to feet and legs, yet even more involved. They type away on the keyboard when fact checking, editing websites, designing graphics, pressing send on emails, and compiling data. These hands also write newsletters, put together meeting folders, prepare for research initiatives, shake hands with public figures, and wave hello and see you tomorrow each day.

Mouth, it is necessary to communicate when being an intern. I say hello when I enter the office, I answer phones, I talk with community members, I converse with consular generals, and I check in with my other fellow intern. There are two of us and we cannot do our jobs without consistent communication. We work together and need to know what the other is working on in order to accomplish all we do. We work in tandem, and communication is key to making our office run as smoothly as it does.

Eyes and ears, I see and listen to a lot as an intern. I see spreadsheets, I look at reports, I review articles, and I make eye contact when communicating face to face with coworkers, community members, and public figures. These ears hear conversations, listen to important speeches, understand new concepts, and listen to feedback. These eyes get tired on occasion, and sometimes strained from looking at a computer screen, yet these eyes also get to see a President make his first speech back form vacation, see a project come to life in a community wide event, get to see and listen to people come together to help the entire city understand violence and come up with solutions towards improvement. These eyes and ears see and hear a lot, and are essential to never miss a beat.

2Heart, probably the most important part of being an intern is being passionate about the work I do each day, which comes from this beating organ in the middle of my chest. I am passionate about helping others, I am inspired when I hear motivational speakers, and I am driven when I research a cause reach out to. Passion is something I need to find in everything I do in order to have meaning and fulfillment in each endeavor I take pursue. All these experiences drive my passion to do what must be done as an intern.

 

A Day in the Life of a RIPT Apparel Intern- Nathaniel Cartwright

Beep! “Nate Cartwright has successfully clocked in.” This is the message I’m greeted with every day when I arrive at RIPT Apparel at 10amand clock in through the fingerprint system. It makes you feel like a secret agent scanning your finger every day before work. The first floor features the break room, the warehouse, and the order fulfillment center. I head upstairs to where the RIPT offices are located. I use my FOB to unlock the door to the office. I pass one of my three bosses who’s in charge of art selection as I make my way to my desk in the middle of the room. The office environment is cozy, welcoming, and usually pretty quiet in the morning. My desk is in the center of the room and from it I can see the artists working on new designs, the designer working on graphics, and my fellow interns handling social media. Down a hallway my other two bosses have offices, as does the director of operations. Together, along with the production and fulfillment crew downstairs, we comprise RIPT Apparel, and online apparel business that sells pop-culture t-shirts.

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I hold the title of marketing assistant at RIPT Apparel. Once upon a time, over a year and three months ago, I was hired as a marketing intern. After three months of work I interviewed to become a marketing assistant. While it didn’t come with a pay raise, it did come with added responsibilities and no end-date to my time at RIPT. My day-to-day activities at RIPT have ranged widely during my time at the company. I’ve been involved in photo shoots, written blog posts, designed marketing graphics, performed search engine optimization, and worked at conventions running our marketing booth among other things.

But what do I do on a daily basis these days? Well, for one I schedule marketing graphics on social media platforms. We release new designs every day so it’s important that every social media platform is posting about them at midnight when they’re released. Onlypult, Viraltag, Hootsuite, and Facebook are all platforms used in scheduling social media content. I also create social media content, whether that involves taking product shots or creating engagement posts. On top of that, I track and analyze key metrics across platforms to see how well they’re performing. I hold giveaways on Instagram to increase engagement and followers. I’m also involved in email marketing. I use a platform called Klaviyo to build and schedule emails. This is a very important part of our selling process, as email generates around 40% of the company’s revenue. I have to choose which segments receive the emails and I also A/B test emails to find the best open rates.

The company is very small, less than 20 total employees, but it makes it feel like you’re a part of a family. They’re all super friendly and easy to talk to, and multiple people bring their dogs into work. In fact, one of my favorite parts of the day is seeing my boss’s dog, Nellie. She’s an adorable golden retriever who wants nothing more than to be your best friend and get pets. If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you can never give Nellie enough pets. But in all seriousness, I’ve learned a lot there. Not only about social media scheduling, email marketing, or blog writing, but about personal responsibility, time management, self confidence, and getting things done on schedule. If something is late, there’s no extension at RIPT Apparel, and it teaches you to stay on top of your work so nothing slips through the cracks. All in all, it’s been a fantastic experience and I strongly recommend working here, particularly if you’re looking for a friendly yet educational environment where you can push yourself while having a support network to help you grow.

 

A day in the Life of a Blackhawks Intern- Zoe Schmerin

1They always say that no two days are the same and that is exactly true when you’re on the street team for the Chicago Blackhawks Hockey Club. Things change during the year, hockey season comes and goes, but the street team is ongoing. Events all around Chicago want to feature the Blackhawks and the Blackhawks want to get their name out into the public for the sake of their fans. That’s where I come in, my coworkers and I are the ones at these events, the ones people see as the face of the Blackhawks and sometimes the first experience people have with the organization. The job is broken into two parts; game day staff and event staff. Let’s discuss them both.

Game day staff is the best part, the time everyone looks forward to. If you aren’t into being at hockey games and taking in that atmosphere maybe this isn’t the right position for you. Games are exciting, so much can happen and it can happen quickly. The positions are chosen at random and range from helping silent auction, manning a sign creation station, getting people excited about the kid’s club, and T-shirts. If I had to choose my favorite I would pick T-shirts every time. This season, the club implemented t-shirt Sunday where every period shirts were thrown and dropped from the parachutes.

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What most people don’t know is that someone needs to actually fill the machine that drops those parachutes all the way up in the rafters. These games were filled with heading up to the rafters, filling the machines and then heading back down to help the Ice Girls throw shirts to fans and repeating. It might seem like a routine but during the games anything can change and you might find yourself delivering presents to season ticket holders for a ticket sales representative. Words of advice, take charge and think on your feet. As I said things change and sometimes you might need to handle a situation meant for someone with higher rank than you.

3Now we go to event staff, these events range from those put on for sponsors and those put on outside of the United Center at festivals and events throughout the Chicagoland area. Generally, only 5 people go to these and there is no “higher up” heading out with you. You load up the cruiser, read the event description on the way, put a smile on your face and make sure these fans have the times of their lives. Questions come from all angles and sometimes you might not know the answer, ITS OKAY TO TELL THEM THAT. The last thing you want is to tell someone something wrong and disappoint them. Let them know that you will ask your supervisor and have them check back for the answer. Events can be long, and people can get annoying but that’s all part of the day and of the job. Over all it’s exciting, it’s fun, and it’s an unforgettable experience.  For someone interested in sports and finding a way in, this is the way to go. Join the street team, make your connections, and keep them for as long as you may need. Most of all, HAVE FUN!

 

A Day in the Life of a Rent Like a Champion Intern- Paul Schwarz

From Corporate to Startup: The Benefits of Interning for a Startup Company

By: Paul Schwarz, DePaul University Marketing Student August 2017 Graduate

1What is Rent Like A Champion?
Three Notre Dame college students listed a vacant apartment on Craigslist and eBay, promoting it as a weekend rental for a football game. Dedicated fans quickly rented the space, grateful to stay somewhere more affordable, and closer, to the stadium.

The immediate success Derrick, Drew, and Jordan experienced evolved into a big game event renting platform, Rent Like A Champion. The company now offer home rentals in over twenty college towns nationwide. Rent Like A Champion is stationed out of Catapult Chicago, the well-known incubator for startup companies whose sales promise to scale quickly.

Rent Like A Champion was featured on the popular television show, Shark Tank, inevitably soaring recognition and sales for the young company after signing a contract with “Sharks,” Mark Cuban and Chris Sacca. The startup team, however, remains small with only seven members: Mike (CEO), Denise, Betty, Hank, Claire, Dave, and Tim.

Day One: Rent Like A Champion2

Gratefully, I was given the opportunity to intern for Rent Like A Champion. A phone
interview was followed by an in-person meeting with the CEO, Mike Doyle. I was anxious to learn I was the new intern for this becoming company. I’ve always felt a passion in entrepreneurship, so I was eager to observe the processes involved in a newer company. However, I have had several other internships prior to this experience, all of which were for large, corporate organizations.

The small, intimate environment, however, created a smooth and comfortable transition into this less familiar atmosphere. The team gave me a company branded t-shirt, coffee mug, and office supplies. After a brief introduction, Mike organized for me to individually meet with each member of the team to better understand their personal role as well as their background before working at Rent Like A Champion.

My experiences working for companies with thousands of employees made it impossible to know everyone. This smaller environment allowed me to personally engage with every member

of the team so that not only was I learning and gaining skills within my own role but I was learning of all the tasks required to operate the company as a whole. Ultimately, this unique company culture created a personable, intimate environment to work in and it highlighted the value of everyone involved in creating a single company.

Daily Tasks

My role at Rent Like A Champion was Business Development. This required me to call on past renters to drive demand during top sport events at the biggest marketed universities, maximize a city’s potential by finding prospective partners within youth sports and other events, and to maintain exceptional customer experience for current consumers.

Unlike interning for a corporation where your title determines your role within the company, startups aren’t limited by labels. To keep strong against competitors, new companies require constant creativity and innovation, skills encouraged by everyone belonging to the company. This unique aspect of younger companies allows you to expand beyond any single role.

Personal Reflection

My experiences prior to interning for Rent Like A Champion at large, corporate companies offered me insight into two different business cultures. There are distinct pros and cons between each setting and, ultimately, understanding your personality as well as your personal and professional goals can help determine where you will find the greatest success.

I recommend to anyone who values interpersonal skills and the ability to learn the processes of the beginning of a company to intern for a startup. I recommend to anyone who dreams of owning their own business one day to intern for a startup. I recommend to anyone who enjoys working within the corporate world but wants to experience a laid-back, welcoming environment to intern for a startup. My experience at Rent Like A Champion is invaluable and I am grateful for the opportunity to work alongside men and women who valued the unique skills I could offer the team and encouraged me to think critically, creatively, and innovatively. I left the internship confirming my true passion: to start up my own company.

 

A Day in the Life of a 3M Intern- Jake Boria

JakeBThis summer I have been in intern for 3M. In this internship I am a sales representative, and work out of Austin, Texas. I am stationed within the Communications Market Division and the team I work for deals closely with AT&T. However, my internship didn’t start in Austin and I’ll explain that now. In the middle of May me and 34 other interns headed to 3M headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota for our internship orientation. Here we first gained access to the 3M system, and got settled in with new emails, computers, and phones. During our time in headquarters were taught the 3M sales model and got a greater understanding of 3M as a whole. However, that is a big task to do. 3M is a company composed of over 88,000 thousand employees globally and sells and manufactures over 55,000 products. Each and every intern had a different job and was assigned to different locations around the country. Before we left for our assignments however we did get to see some amazing this happening at 3M headquarters. For example, we got to tour the 3M Innovation center and you can see a picture of a few fellow interns and myself below.

During my time in Austin I have had a few different responsibilities. My largest comes from performing product trainings for our fiber products to AT&T tech garages. I have spent a few weeks in Houston and even spent time in Madison and Milwaukee WI. Below is a picture of a co-worker of mine conducting product training while I shadowed him in, Houston.JakeB1

On top of these product training’s I have spent a lot of time in the office doing some account analysis and finding key opportunities to sell and push several of our product lines. By bridging the gaps between product sales I have been able to identify tech garages nationally that should be a point of interest for our division. Lastly, I have spent a lot of time on salesforce.com and have helped conduct a salesforce.com ‘playbook’ for our AT&T team. A struggle that existed was confusion with a new CRM system, and hopefully through several meetings that I have lead I have made salesforce.com more simplified and easy to use.

This internship has taught me many things about both the job and myself. The most important thing that I have learned this summer is that it is okay to take on challenges that do not directly relate to your skill set. By getting familiar with excel and doing some account analysis I have been able to strengthen my skillset and have added value to the division in which I was placed. In terms of the job, I have learned that organization is so important for any field sales position, and by being organized with planning sales calls and visits you can truly be the most effective. I have loved my experience and have truly learned more than I thought was imaginable. My time in Austin has been wonderful, and I am glad I could intern for such a well respected and highly performing company.

 

A Day in the Life of a Walmart Intern- Anna Gleyzer

annagleyzerThis summer I am interning at Walmart’s headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas. I am working in the Modular and Category Development department in consumables, specifically the laundry care group. Here at Walmart I have two projects this summer. My first project is to help with the assortment discipline process. My second project, the one I will be presenting at the end of the summer looks at how to get consumers to add value to their basket by buying a variety of products in the laundry care group.

I come into work every day Monday- Friday from 8am-5pm. We have multiple buildings here at Walmart but I work primarily at the home office. I will also travel between the Mohawk building (a conference center), and the Layout center, which has products on modulars for our department to work with. I come into work and take a look at what meetings I have that day and what still needs to get done with my project.

walmartblogI sit in a pod with 4 other people: Norm, who is the buyer for the laundry group and Kim, who is the replenishment manager. Then there’s Juan, who works on Keith’s team and does the mods for laundry. Lastly, there’s Jerome who is the buyer for dish soaps and sponges.

Working on these projects consists of multiple things. I work with a lot of data, primarily from a market research company called Nielsen, as well as working with the category team at Sun Laundry Corporation. Their category team has helped me with data, charts, and graphs. My project looks at consumer data of buying behaviors of laundry and looking at what the barriers are to cross purchasing in the 7 steps of laundry.

walmart2I then have lunch at the cafeteria in the home office with some of the other interns that I met. At the beginning of the program, we had a two day orientation and that is where I was able to make a group of friends working in all different departments here at Walmart. After lunch I usually either continue to work on my projects or I attend meetings. There are a couple different kinds of meetings I usually attend. I have meetings with my mentor, Martha, who works in the Marketing building doing market research. Walmart gives everyone of their interns a mentor and manager, so every 3 weeks I meet with her and touch base about how I’m doing and how my projects are coming along. I also attend biweekly meetings with the VP of our department, Corey, and his entire team.

walmart3The main meetings that I attend are assortment discipline meetings. Assortment discipline is a series of workshops that help the buyer know the most information about his category. These workshops include a kickoff meeting, customer behavior tree, and clustering. These meetings look at consumer insights data to help our buyers make the best decisions when buying products looking at customer loyalty.

This summer I’ve been learning a lot. I’ve been working primarily in the laundry group but have had interactions with buyers, associate buyers, and merchandising specialists in other consumables as well. I work with Nielsen data and different excel data sheets that show consumer trends on buying laundry products. I’ve also learned a lot of time management. Walmart is the world’s largest retailer and things move fast in the office. There are new products coming every day from the suppliers and because we rely so much on the consumers, Walmart has to be adaptable to what they want and what they are purchasing.

Walmart has given me the opportunity to work directly in the field that I would like to pursue after college, category management with consumer packaged goods. I have absorbed a lot of information that I will bring to my next position whether it be another role at Walmart, a retailer, or a consumer packaged goods company.

 

A Day in the Life of the Chicago Fire Intern- Jack Waite

This summer I have had a wonderful opportunity and experience to be able to work within the Chicago Fire Soccer Club organization as a marketing and events intern. Specifically, I spend most of my time focuses on a specific department within the organization, the club ran recreational soccer league. This department is not only one of the mo st successful areas of the clubs business, but it also is the department that interacts the most with the organizations target market. The interaction on a daily basis outside a conventional has been a great learning experience and has given me insight on numerous strategies for the sports industry. As usual for a professional team, the Fire organization is large which can sometimes be overwhelming and prove to be a challenging place to learn as just a small fish in a large pond. However, working closely on a team of about ten people within a specific department has been extremely beneficial.

In realm of an events intern, day-to-day activities for this internship have remained fairly constant with exception of specific events such as Team USA game watches, tournaments, Fire matches, and other events. The main aspect of this area of the internship is to be at the events and make sure everything runs smoothly giving the fans and recreational players the best experience as possible. However, as a marketing intern my duties and projects fluctuate on a daily basis. Once a week the team sits down to go over the game plan for the day and week, communicate issues and opportunities, and to also brainstorm innovative ideas that would benefit not only the recreational soccer department, but also the organization as a whole. Recently I have brought many ideas to the table regarding the issues I set forth in my marketing plan. My hope is that these ideas and the plan that brought to the table will translate to a greater connection with the team and our specific department of recreational soccer. Additionally, there are some days and nights that I work intensively with the digital and social media specialist. Digital and social media is continuing to grow as a dominant marketing strategy which will prove to be crucial in my overall experience of learning the in’s and out’s of marketing. This aspect of the internship has also allowed me to be extremely creative and innovative which will become a key asset of mine in the future due to this experience. Furthermore, as in all areas of business, including marketing, there is definitely a sales aspect to the internship. Throughout the events and recreational league matches I am charged with the duty to collect payments from teams. Having to promote and sell has definitely gone a long way in developing me not only as a sales person, but also as a speaker to complete strangers, which has shifted from a personal weakness to strength due to this internship.

Overall, I believe this has been a great experience because I have been exposed to many areas of working with a professional sports team rather than just solely marketing. At first there was definitely more of a focus of the events portion of the internship but being proactive I reached out to my supervisor and sought more responsibilities within the marketing space. This led me to being much more involved with social and digital media which I believe has been the most beneficial aspect of the internship because it has allowed me to analyze consumer trends, and implement creative ideas based on my findings. In the end this internship will help me in the future because it has given me a diverse and broad learning experience, as well as, it has proven that there are numerous ways to make an impact within a professional sports organization outside of the front

 

A Day in the Life of a ZappySales Intern- Melanie Andres

zappysales2My name is Melanie Andres and I am currently a business development intern at ZappySales, an online retailer that sells a broad range of products including sporting goods, furniture, cosmetics, bedding, electronics, clothing, jewelry, and furniture. ZappySales was started four years ago by Igal Rubinshtien, alum of DePaul. Being a young company, it is fairly small. With a team of less than 20 people, many would think that ZappySales is minor, but once you look a little closer, you’d see that this is a company that is growing exponentially and is bursting at its seams. I think what I love most about this company is that they take on intern after intern, showing that they are open to young talent and the new ideas that come with them.

Since this was my first internship, I had no idea what to expect. I honestly thought that I would walk into something that would resemble Mad Men. I was wrong, but in many ways I’m glad that I was.

The ZappySales office is located right across the street from the Sears

The common area at the ZappySales offices

The common area at the ZappySales office

Tower. So right after my classes finish around 1pm, I take a short walk from the DePaul loop campus to the ZappySales office. The ZappySales office is rented out from Level, a company that owns seven floors of the building to a lot of start-ups and small businesses. Once I get to our floor, I am greeted by Dana, the front desk person for Level.

By the time I get to the office suite, Igal Rubinshtein and Andrew Porter, the CEO and the Director of Sales and Marketing, are already hard at work tending to their daily activities. Andrew usually briefs me on what tasks need to get done that day. My first task is usually taking care of backorders and emailing customers if there has been a delay in getting their item shipped out. After that, it has become my responsibility to facilitate relationships with wholesalers, so I usually get on the phone, make some calls, send some emails, and follow up with those that I have already gotten a conversation going with. The goal of these conversations is to ultimately find wholesalers that have products we can feature on our websites and marketplaces. Once we have come to an agreement with these wholesalers, the information is then given to the IT department to upload onto the websites. After that, I usually help out with the result of completing the backorder emails: the customer service emails asking for tracking numbers and cancellations. It’s something that I have recently been introduced to, and I’m getting the hang of it.

At the end of the work day, usually 5pm, I make my way back to the lobby, say goodbye to Dana, and make my way to the bus home.

Although it isn’t the glitz that Mad Men portrays, I now have a better understanding of what marketing is. Sales have become a big part of what I do every day, and it is something that I have found that I have a knack for. Having this sort of experience is valuable to me because by being exposed to different areas of marketing, it’s helping me steer myself towards something I’d love to do after graduating. The work may be demanding and fast paced, but seeing the results of facilitating relationships and being a part of a developing business make it more than worthwhile. And as this internship ends, I am happy to say that I have accepted a full time position with the company starting in June right after finals.

 

A Day in the Life of a MARCH Marketing LLC Intern- Caitlin Romolt

Hello everyone!

My name is Caitlin Romolt, and I am currently a marketing intern at an awesome military marketing company called MARCH Marketing LLC. MARCH is a military marketing company, which was started by a veteran himself, Tom Aiello. In fact, Tom recently received an award for North Western Kellogg students and alumni who have been named “2016 Youn Impact Scholars”. This group consists of the most innovative and creative Kellogg students and alumni passionate about social impact. We are a small marketing company that helps give back to other veterans who continue to help our country. This is through the use exclusive strategy, consulting, marketing, recruiting, public relations, social media, and word-of-mouth communications for products and services targeting military and veteran families. Every year 10% of our profits go to local veteran based charities. MARCH has already in the past four years, have raised over $100,000,000 and provided work for over 100,000 veterans. Giving back to the veteran community is what we strive to do as a company. We want to improve the lives of active members, veterans, and their families.

Part of my job as a marketing intern is working with a lot of nonprofit organizations that help raise money for veterans. These companies include Veteran Launch, Operation Rising Star, Helmets to Hardhats, and Rags of Honor. What I do as an intern, is heavy analytical skills. I retrieve their data given from my boss: including demographics, marketing strategies needed to be used, and organize base presentations using PowerPoints and PDFs for my boss to present to clients and other companies. For example, Operation Rising Star is a veteran talent agency. My job was to look at its competitors such as American Idol and The Voice and analyze their marketing strategies. These included websites, Facebook, and Twitter, and see what trends they were doing to make their marketing effective. I heavily use excel to keep a list of all the veteran owned companies that are in the United States, which is over 600 companies. As an intern I am very reliable and must meet exact deadlines for presentations, which I am given usually about a week to set up.

3As an intern I am learning every day
more and more about marketing. Being an intern at MARCH Marketing LLC is so rewarding. Knowing that our marketing agency is giving back to the veterans reassures that what I do for this company matters not only to the company but to the 25 million veterans who have served for our country.

Here is a picture of MARCH Marketing LLC leading the panel discussion at the IFJ with leaders of the VA, Defense Department, and National Guard! #DayintheLifeofaMARCHIntern #ILoveMyCompany

Well, that is all for now, I am still learning and being inspired by such a truly amazing company.

Regards,

Caitlin

 

A Day in the Life of a Bosch Channel Marketing Intern- Tania Daniel

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Before I ever entered the “working” world, I never really understood or factored in the time it took to commute to work. Now, that’s all I calculate when talking about jobs.

6:00am alarm buzzes in my ear. I crack one eye open to see nothing but a light nightglow from the window. The sun hasn’t even risen yet and I am up- SNOOZE.

Fast forward 3 or 4 snoozes and I am racing against  the clock to get ready for the Clybourn Metra outbound train at 7:21 to Mt. Prospect. The uber drops me off at the train and I board, for what seems like, my second home- the train. Now, I enjoy this part of the morning, for I am not alone on this reverse commute. Just to give a little background, I work at Bosch Power Tool Corporation, specifically the headquarters in North America, which ultimately has 500+ employees in 7 different business units. So, on this reverse commute to Mt. Prospect, I see my fellow 17 brave commuters. A morning chitchat on the train is a must and 8 stops later, we all get off the train to then board the Bosch Commuter Bus with Carlos. Now, I only get to spend approximately 16 minutes with Carlos a day (train to Bosch, and round trip back to train after the workday is over) but he always puts a smile on my face. “Gooooooooood Morning fellow Bosch employees” brightens my day in the morning and “Areeeeeee we ready to go home everyone?” in the afternoon makes me feel taken care of. 8 minutes later, we arrive  to Bosch’s front doors, we walk down a 400 ft. hallway, I say farewell to my fellow commuters until our 4:21 bus back to the train, I go up one flight of stairs, I round the corner, say “Good Morning” to the Measuring Tools (MT) team and I make it to my cubicle by 8:00am. But my cubicle doesn’t really look like a cubicle- more like mix between a file/ storage cabinet.  But first, coffee. (Valid side note: I am beyond blessed to be one of the only business units (Measuring Tools) to have our own coffee set up so we can always have it at hand.) 2 creams, and 3 sugars later, I am back at my so-called “desk.”

Half of my desk is full of shipments and orders, and the other half is 1buried under paper work. First, I open up my computer, login to Outlook and check my meetings and such for the day. As I am a part time intern now (I was full time during the summer) I spend most of my time following through with the projects I have already started and keeping all promotions organized. I have worked on two big projects during the summer, one that stacks up the promotion side of my desk, which was Sell to Sail. The other was A+ pages for Amazon which was buried with all the paperwork on the other half of my desk.  I usually liked to make sure all of my shipments were out on time so I start with the Sell to Sail project every morning. The Sell to Sale project is an internal 1-year (started in January 2015) project for MT where whoever in the field sells the most, will win a free cruise in April 2016. This project is split between 3 business units (Accessories, MT, and Brand) so many meetings are set up through out the week to make sure all loose ends are met. I have personally created the “messages in a bottle” (reminders) about the contest. In addition, within those bottles where little “map messages” that I created with brand to give the guys in the field a little boost of confidence. (As the project continues to the end of internship 2(December), I am excited to see how it all falls into place.)

Roughly 4 hours of meetings, shipments, and mailroom visits, lunch finally arrives. Now, at Bosch, at exactly12:00pm the building is dinning in the cafeteria or en route to their lunch destination.  I usually grab a quick bite to eat in the cafeteria for two reasons. One is because Bosch subsidizes their cost of food for a cheaper more convenient (in the building) bite to eat. The second is because I don’t have a car. (But I mainly eat there because of the first point.)

The clock strikes 1:00pm and everyone is back in their cubicles grinding away at their work. By now, I am transitioning on to the other side of my desk, which is the current A+ page project. This is another project I started as a summer intern and am continuing to use and update until the end of internship. Bosch’s A+ pages are located on Amazon and they are meant to be a little profile of the products we sell. I was trained in how to update these pages but they are meant to be user friendly and easy place to understand how the products work, what the products kit includes and compare other products Bosch has. (A simplified version of) the process goes like this:

  1. Locate product manager’s specifications on MDP (Media Data Pool)
  2. Find pictures/ description of product
  3. Download information on computer
  4. Login/ copy and paste all info on to Amazon
  5. Get approved by Amazon

Then, repeat for EVERY Bosch product on Amazon, so one can see how3 this can be a lengthy project. There are two aspects that I really enjoy about this project. The first reason is that I get access all data on products, which gives ample opportunities to really understand the products at hand. The second reason is, and possibly my absolute favorite part, that my work is on Amazon!

Fast forward roughly 3 hours of research, Amazon, and downloads and 4:00pm rolls around. Everyday, before I head out, my manager and I have a quick wrap up chat for the day. Wrap up with manager? Check.  Now, for the commute back to Chicago.

Per usual, Carlos greets the 18 of us with his “Areeeeeee we ready to go home everyone?” We all grin happily, give a little sigh of exhaustion as he starts up the engine for us to make the 4:21 train to Chicago.